health

HOW HEELS CAN FAIL YOU

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A gorgeous pair of heels can make a woman’s heart flutter with much excitement, especially when paired with the perfect dress. The confidence-boosting mechanism is remarkable. But enough with all the rainbows and positivity…what about all those times you were in so much pain from your shoes that all you wanted to do was chuck your heels across the street and crawl home?

Here I list FIVE SITUATIONS where heels can fail you miserably…

RUNNING FOR THE BUS

I wouldn’t classify myself as the fittest person out there but in saying that, I am highly capable of running from zone A to zone B in order to make my bus. Oh did I forget to mention that the prerequisite is that I need to be wearing flats or sneakers? Several times I tried to running after a bus in heels and the whole process was not only painful but also humiliating. I could feel all the eyes cast over to “that silly girl who’s running for the bus in heels”. Don’t be that person and don’t do that to your poor feet. You’re pretty much inviting a sprain or a fail – which has happened to me before too.

SHOPPING

Ladies, if you are shopping in heels…*picture me shaking my head*. ROOKIE ERROR. If you’ve planned for a big shopping day (which I hope you have, because who doesn’t love a shopping spree?), your feet are your best weapon towards shopping success. Happy comfortable feet = soaring energy and much fun! Tired, sore and painful feet will do nothing to elevate your mood. In fact it will just make you super grumpy thanks to all that discomfort and who knows what kind of shopping choices you’ll make in that head space…

STANDING EVENTS

If you know that you’ll be attending an event – be it for work or social – and that there will be a lot of standing, don’t test your feet’s limits by wearing high stilettos or pumps. Also avoid wearing heels you’ve just bought – hello blisters? If the occasion requires some sort of a heel for formality reasons, at least go for a reduced heel height and make sure you bring flats in your bag.

INTERNSHIPS

Let’s face it – most of the time internships or work experience jobs can be hard work. It may sound like a cliche but chances are you WILL be doing those coffee runs and errand jobs. I get that heels can make you feel a bit more glam and confident but think about the long-term consequences. Are you really going to be efficient in those heels? Switch to sensible shoes instead and be that star intern that’s not suffering from non-paid work AND foot pain.

AT UNIVERSITY

Wearing heels to uni is a big no-n0, especially if you are lucky enough to attend the University of New South Wales. Speaking from personal experience, let me just reinforce…heels and the UNSW stairs do not marry well together. Even without the stairs, getting around a university campus in heels is no easy feat. Uni is supposed to be a casual and relaxed environment – not a place to torture your feet unnecessarily!

Does any of the above situations sound familiar to you? Feel free to comment below and let me know your HIGH HEEL FAILS.

Otherwise join me in switching the heel to save our soles!

-JL

TIPS TO HEALTHIER SOLES

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Heels are bad for you. A concept that most women understand but find it difficult to follow through with changes in their footwear choices. There is often a misconception that wearing low-heeled shoes is the same as wearing rocket-high stilettos – so why not just opt for the taller version that makes our legs look longer and confidence levels higher?

That is the wrong approach ladies!

As with many things, high heels come in all shapes and sizes. More importantly they come in various heel heights. If you are going to wear heels, then you should opt for ones that have a heel height of 5cm (2 inches) or lower. Any higher and you’re really contributing to amplifying the risks of foot problems.

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On top of HOW HIGH your heel is – another crucial aspect to keep in mind is HOW LONG you’re wearing them for. You may be wearing 5cm heels but if you do so for prolonged periods of time e.g. over 4 hours for more than 3 days a week – you are still doing irreversible damage to your entire body.

According to the American Osteopathic Association, 1 in 10 women wear high heels at least 3 days a week, and a third of them have fallen wearing them.

On top of falling, there are many other negative and unpleasant effects wearing heels can have on your body. These include:

  • Bunions
  • Back pain
  • Nerve damage
  • Plantar fascitis
  • Lower back problems
  • In-grown toe nails
  • Bad posture/balance
  • Damage to leg tendons
  • Osteoarthritis of the knee
  • Sore toes, ankles and calves

TIPS TO HEALTHIER SOLES

CHOOSE WISELY

Check the fit of the shoe to make sure it’s the right size for you and please don’t always go for those thin stilettos. Embrace lower heels that are 5cm or under or at least opt for shoes that have a wider base with room for your feet to breathe. Avoid shoes that forces your feet to squeeze tightly against each other or ones with lack of support as this can ruin the balance of your weight distribution.

MAKE THE SWITCH MORE OFTEN

Although lower heels are better than their taller counterparts, it’s still not the ideal footwear choice. Try saving heels for special occasions where there is minimal standing/walking and wear flats more often in your busy day-to-day life. If your job or situation requires you to wear heels often, try to find times during the day to slip them off to give your feet a break. Alternatively always bring a pair of flats in your bag for emergencies.

FIND SUPPORT

To all the high-heel lovers out there, invest in soft, insertable soles!  They can help with stability in ensuring your foot doesn’t slide forward constantly when you’re walking. They can also provide more cushion support which can add comfort to your walking.

-JL

THE PRICE OF WEARING HEELS

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Whether you’re a high heel devotee or the ocassional wearer of heels, there’s one common issue – most women aren’t truly aware of how heels are impacting your body. Sure they can be a fashionable choice and make you feel better but are you aware of what you’re sacrificing?

High heels can cause foot problems amongst other body issues and it can even exacerbate existing problems you already have. Here we give you the lowdown on the top five harmful effects of heels, according to FootHealth.com and AllWomansTalk

1) LOWER BACK PAIN

Heels generally are not designed for comfort purposes. They usually have less support for your feet and due to the height of a heel, there is constant pressure on the balls of your feet. As a result, this causes an imbalance in weight distribution, often resulting in lower back pain. This is especially the case if you’re constantly wearing heels for long periods of time. Your posture can also be affected due to the constant imbalance. Additionally, the higher the heels are, the more likely your lower back has to arch in order to keep an upright positioning. This can also contribute to back pain.

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2) SORENESS ALL AROUND

As mentioned above, when you’re wearing heels, you’re dumping most of your body weight on the balls of your feet. This followed by constant strain and walking can cause your feet to feel sore and in pain after a while. The thing is, the pain doesn’t just stop at the feet. Your calves are often affected too and before you know it, you’re going to bed acheing sore.

3) SPRAINS & FALLS

If you’re a fan of those ultra thin and soaring high stilettos AND you haven’t tripped or fell yet – note that you are very lucky. Uneven floors surround us all the time – think drainage grates, pot holes, cobblestone roads etc. These surfaces are just waiting to trap your point heels and cause mass destruction (and humiliation) to your most vulnerable body parts. Heels can cause your feet and ankles to move in a supinated (turned outward) position and this in turn, puts you at greater risk of losing your balance and spraining your ankles. Let’s face it, heels look pretty but a sprained or broken ankle is definitely not the look you’re after. In all honesty, heels can be seriously dangerous!

4) NASTY CORNS, BLISTERS AND CALLOUSES

When you wear a fresh pair of heels, you only see the good side first. It’s all glamourous and fun upon first impression. Fast forward five hours laters, that initial look has totally faded and once you slip out of the shoes, you’re greeted with unpleasant new friends aka. corns, callouses and blisters. Three things women who wear high heels are probably familiar with. We all hate them yet we often disregard the cause of the issue. Esentially these nasties appear when you squeeeze your feet into that narrow and pointed toe box that’s often present on many heels. After all, nothing rarely ever looks good after being trapped and squished in a confined space after hours?

5) HARM TO THE KNEE JOINTS

According to Joint Essential, one study conducted at Harvard University in 1998 concluded that the heels of the shoe can have a dramatic effect on the knee joint. As in the foot, the body’s weight is evenly distributed between the front and back portions of the knee when standing barefoot. Heels can essentially contribute to degenerative arthritis in the knee. Whilst this can occur to both women and men, wearing heels certainly doesn’t help. The higher the heel, the greater the impact is on the knee and other joints.


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Heels aren’t looking too glam now are they?

-JL

THE TRUTH ABOUT HEELS

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Most women who wear heels are no stranger to the discomfort and pain that such shoes can bring but have you ever thought twice about the real damage it’s doing to your feet and body?

Ko and Lee (2013, p. 1309) suggests that high-heeled shoes can induce musculoskeletal diseases such as Plantar Fascilitis.

So what does this complicated medical term mean? According to The Hamilton Foot Clinic, Plantar Fasciitis is a condition characterised by a sharp, stabbing pain in the heel of the foot.

As descirbed by PubMed Health, the plantar fascia is the thick tissue on the bottom of the foot. It connects the heel bone to the toes and creates the arch of the foot. Plantar Fascitis occurs when this tissue becomes overstretched, swollen and inflamed – causing heel pain. Wearing ill-fitting shoes with poor arch support can increase the likelihood of Plantar Fascilitis – something that many high-heel wearers are unaware of.

Just when you thought it couldn’t get any worse, did you know that high heels can also cause another painful foot condition called Morton’s Neuroma?

As explained by The Hamilton Foot Clinic, neuroma affects the nerves between your toes, causing a stabbing sensation that is painful when you walk. Accordingly, women who wear high heels or narrow-fitting shows are usually more prone to neuroma. If you ignore these foot symptops, irregularities can occur that may hinder optimal foot function and aggravate the condition, such as high arches, overpronation and hypermobility.

If you experience such pain, it’s best to take off those heels and massage the affected area as this can help to alleviate pain. If your condition is a bit more severe, it’s best to seek professional care from a qualified podiatrist of foot-care specialist as they may recommend long-term solutions and tips.

However there is also an easier way to prevent all of this from potentially happening…#SwitchTheHeel and #SaveYourSoles. It’s that easy.

-JL